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futuredudeman:

cassbuttmcgee:

radiogrimshaw:

have you ever met someone who is like the human version of period cramps

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I think this is the first time something has conveyed to me with true clarity just how bad period cramps are.

(via thee-fitness-goddess)

Source: michaelgclifford
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xv7:

y’all r gettin way too accurate with these it’s scaring me

(via thekilejohnson)

Source: coachcrewneck
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bruinsstrong:

This story keeps on getting better and better

bruinsstrong:

This story keeps on getting better and better

(via ourcrimescene)

Source: bruinsstrong
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unapologetakallyme:

isaiahpete:

ill-expression:

damaury:

Yesssss!

that jiggle. yes bey.

We thank Him.

Damn, Bey!

unapologetakallyme:

isaiahpete:

ill-expression:

damaury:

Yesssss!

that jiggle. yes bey.

We thank Him.

Damn, Bey!

(via dont-touchmycurves)

Source: fiercegifs
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whitepaperlyrics:

your-daisyfreshgirl:

When did he stop treating you like a princess?

Domestic violence and abuse can happen to anyone, but the vast majority of victims are young girls and women simply because they are “the weaker sex”.

Did you know:

  • On average, 2 women a week are killed by a current or former male partner. This constitutes nearly 40% of all female homicide victims.
  • 45% of women are abused/raped by current husbands or partners, 9% by former partners, and a further 29% of perpetrators were otherwise known to the victim. Only 17% are attacked by by strangers.
  • 44% of victims of domestic violence are involved in more than one incident. A large number of women experience the same abuse every week.
  • On average, a woman is assaulted 35 times before her first call to the police.
  • 30% of domestic violence either starts or will intensify during pregnancy.
  • In almost 75% of incidents, a child is present or in a room closeby.

THIS HAS GOT TO STOP. IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE THIS WAY.

It’s time to show the world that we are not weak and we will simply not stand for this kind of ill treatment. Women should be treated as princesses, like Ariel and Cinderella, who never have to live in fear of their so-called Prince Charming.

It’s time to stand up. To speak out. To be heard.

Women’s domestic abuse/violence helplines (worlwide):

UK

  • Women’s Aid/National Domestic Violence Helpline: 0808 2000 247
  • EB Women’s Aid: 0800 0852 654
  • Refuge: 020 7395 7713
  • Wales Domestic Abuse Helpline: 0808 80 10 800
  • Women’s Aid Federation (Northern Ireland): 0800 917 1414
  • National Centre for Domestic Violence: 0844 8044 999
  • WDA Helpline: 0161 636 7525
  • Rape Crisis support: 0808 802 9999
  • Relate: 0300 100 1234
  • Kiran Asian women’s aid: 020 8558 1986
  • Independent Choices: 0161 636 7525

USA

  • The National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-7233 or 1-800-787-3224
  • DAHMW: 1-888-743-5754
  • Safe Horizon for DA/V: 800.621.HOPE (4673)
  • Safe Horizon for Rape: 212.227.3000
  • Love Is Respect: 1-866-331-9474
  • National Teen Dating abuse/violence:
    866-331-9474 or 866-331-8453
  • RAINN (Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network): 1-800-656-4673

AUSTRALIA

  • White Ribbon: 02 9045 8444
  • National Sexual Assault/Family/Domestic hotline: 1800 737 732
  • LifeLine: 13 11 14
  • The Women’s Domestic Violence Crisis Service:
    (03) 9322 3555 or STD Freecall 1800 015 188
  • Sexual Assault Crisis Line: 1800 806 292
  • Domestic Violence Victoria, AUS: 9921 0828
  • DVConnect Womensline - Queensland: 1800 811 811

OTHER/MORE - some repeats:

  • National Child Abuse Helpline: 1-800-422-4453
  • National Domestic Violence Crisis Line: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline (TDD): 1-800-787-32324
  • Center for the Prevention of School Violence: 1-800-299-6504
  • Child Abuse Helpline: 1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453)
  • Domestic Violence Helpline: 1-800-548-2722
  • Healing Woman Foundation (Abuse): 1-800-477-4111
  • Child Abuse Hotline Support & Information: 1-800-792-5200
  • Women’s Aid National Domestic Violence Helpline: (UK Only) 0345 023 468
  • Sexual Abuse Centre: (UK Only) 0117 935 1707
  • Sexual Assault Support (24/7, English & Spanish): 1-800-223-5001
  • Domestic & Teen Dating Violence (English & Spanish): 1-800-992-2600
  • Relationships Australia: 1300-364-277
  • Criminal Law Advice Line: 020 7251 8887 

Let’s put a stop to women’s domestic violence and abuse - FULL STOP.

If you’re being treated in a way you know isn’t right, pick up the phone and get help. And get out. IT IS NEVER TOO LATE FOR YOUR HAPPILY EVER AFTER. IT’S TIME TO CHANGE.

If in need of immediate help from abuse/violence, call the police (999/911 etc).

We’re in this together.

~

"When did he stop treating you like a princess?"/It doesn’t have to be this way - DISCLAIMER: I do not own these images. Courtesy of Saint Hoax.

FIND OUT MORE HERE.

~

REBLOG AND SPREAD THE WORD. NOW.

GET REBLOGGING PEOPLE.

(via getoutthewhey)

Source: your-daisyfreshgirl
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explosm:

By . C&H for breakfast? Yes please! Have seconds over at 

(via getoutthewhey)

Source: explosm
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Laura Prepon for Bella Magazine.

Laura Prepon for Bella Magazine.

(via sambarks)

Source: rachelduncns
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spicy-vagina-tacos:

i need to get fucked by something other than my life

(via teatravelandtraining)

Source: spicy-vagina-tacos
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epessant:

bookjunkie26:

samswittyusername:

alangwiggy:

madmothmiko:

acolytejezebel:

Impossible!!

How do you even…. ?

This is the type of stage pageantry that people pay hundreds to see. Imagine how long the costume designer took intricately put into making those dresses the people behind the scene are the true heroes of theater 

The one on the right is a true work of art

THEATRE

AH YES THEATRE

This takes quick changing to a whole new level.

(via theholyheadharpy)

Source: wannopvalentine
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diamondfordisease:

neaato:

David Tran’s company, Huy Fong Foods Inc., is moving to a $40-million, 655,000-square-foot facility in Irwindale that could triple its production capacity. (Gina Ferazzi, Los Angeles Times / March 25, 2013)

The gig: David Tran, 68, founded hot sauce company Huy Fong Foods Inc. in Chinatown in 1980 and a few years later introduced Sriracha sauce to the U.S.

His Sriracha, a version of a hot sauce originating in Si Racha, Thailand, quickly spread through the San Gabriel Valley and eventually the nation. The fiery red concoction in the clear bottle with the distinctive green cap and rooster logo has since gone mainstream: Google “Sriracha” and you’ll find such things as cookbooks, water bottles, iPhone cases and T-shirts.

Huy Fong Foods, which is still privately owned, sold more than $60 million worth of sauce last year, office manager Donna Lam said.

Refugee: When North Vietnam’s communists took power in South Vietnam, Tran, a major in the South Vietnamese army, fled with his family to the U.S. After settling in Los Angeles, Tran couldn’t find a job — or a hot sauce to his liking.

So he made his own by hand in a bucket, bottled it and drove it to customers in a van. He named his company Huy Fong Foods after the Taiwanese freighter that carried him out of Vietnam.

Packing heat: Early on, one of Tran’s packaging suppliers told him, “Your product is too spicy. How can you sell it?” Add a tomato base, some friends counseled. Sweeten the flavor to pair it better with chicken, others said. But Tran stood firm.

"Hot sauce must be hot. If you don’t like it hot, use less," he said. "We don’t make mayonnaise here."

Pricing it right: Tran had just one guiding business principle: “Make a rich man’s sauce at a poor man’s price.” In more than two decades of operation, Tran has kept the wholesale price of his sauce constant, but he would not disclose it. A 28-ounce bottle goes for about $4, depending on the retailer.

"My American dream was never to become a billionaire," Tran said. "We started this because we like fresh, spicy chili sauce."

That means cranking up the chili content of each bottle and making sure each pepper is as hot as possible, Tran said. As the company grew, Huy Fong Foods developed a relationship with a supplier in Ventura County and carefully monitored the entire growing process from seed to harvest.

Now, each chili is processed within a day of harvesting to ensure peak spiciness.

Production strained: In 2007, the company oversold its sauces and ran out of the peppers with three months left in the year. Stores marked up their prices and many started to hoard the sauce, Lam said.

Under immense pressure from customers, Tran considered his possibilities. He could buy supermarket jalapenos, but that left no way to predict the heat of the sauce. Brined peppers were also out of the question — who knew how those had been grown?

So, Huy Fong Foods went to each of its customers and asked them to wait — and they did. “We didn’t lose any customers,” Lam said.

Now the company sets a monthly production quota for each sauce. Every bottle of sauce produced already has been sold, Lam said.

Competition: The popularity of Huy Fong Foods’ Sriracha sauce has spurred many copycats and competitors. Because the sauce is named for the Thai city, the company cannot trademark the name.

Roland Foods in New York makes its own variety, Sriracha Chili Sauce, in a similarly shaped yellow-capped bottle featuring two dragons instead of a rooster. Frito-Lay is testing a Sriracha-flavored potato chip, and Subway is experimenting with a creamy Sriracha sauce for sandwiches.

But Tran said he’s not bothered by the fact that others are trying to capitalize on the market his sauce created.

"We just do our own thing and try to keep the price low," Tran said.

Revenue grows about 20% a year even with all the competition. Huy Fong Foods has never spent a dollar on advertising.

Family business: Tran has no interest in branching out beyond making Sriracha and two other hot sauces, Chili Garlic and Sambal Oelek. All the Sriracha-branded products online are made by others. He spends hours Googling “Sriracha” and chuckling over fans’ creations.

He’s turned down multiple lucrative offers to sell his company, fearing his vision would be compromised.

"This company, she is like a loved one to me, like family. Why would I share my loved one with someone else?" Tran said.

He intends to keep it a family business: His son is the president, and his daughter is vice president.

He has repeatedly rejected pleas to sell stock in the company and turned down financiers who offer him money to increase production significantly.

"If our product is still welcomed by the customer, then we will keep growing," Tran said.

New quarters: Huy Fong Foods has operated out of two buildings in Rosemead since the late 1980s, but it’s moving to a $40-million, 655,000-square-foot factory and headquarters in Irwindale that could triple its production capacity. The company expects to complete the transition by June.

"Who knows where the company will go? We just always try to make the best sauce possible," Tran said.

Getting personal: Tran and his wife, Ada, live in Arcadia. They have two children.

frank.shyong@latimes.com

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-himi-tran-20130414,0,835689.story

Hot sauce must be hot. If you don’t like it hot, use less,” he said."We don’t make mayonnaise here."

(via not-your-cute-little-asian-girl)

Source: neaato
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fallontonight:

Ron Funches is performing on the show tonight! 

Source: adhp